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The Neo-Glossary: an (unofficial) guide to common Neocities terms

If you’re new to Neocities, chances are you’ve probably seen these words around but don’t really know what they mean. As someone who had no experience with old web stuff and Neocities/Geocities in general, believe me, I was in the same boat. But fear not, fellow newbie! Here I’ve compiled some common terms and page types used frequently by many other users, with handy definitions to help you understand them better.

Table of Contents:

The Neo-Glossary: an (unofficial) guide to common Neocities terms

Table of Contents:

Angelfire

adoptables

banner

Blingee

blinkie

button

clique

districts (neighborhoods)

Dollz

fanlisting

frame (or ‘iframe’)

Geocities

Gifcities

glitter text

guestbook

Kao-Ani

Kaomoji

Neocities

pixels

pixel trading

shrine

splash page (or ‘flash splash’)

stamps

toybox

userboxes

Web 1.0

web archive (the Wayback Machine)

Webgarden

webring


Angelfire

adoptables

affiliates

ASCII art

        As defined by Wikipedia: “ASCII art is a graphic design technique that uses computers for presentation and consists of pictures pieced together from the 95 printable characters defined by the ASCII Standard from 1963 and ASCII compliant character sets with proprietary extended characters.” Examples here.

banner

Blingee

        Blingee is a website where users can add glitter, stickers, or other embellishments to photos. Also used to describe the product of said website, blingees are decorative gifs made with the site. After the demise of Flash support through web browsers, the site has a much smaller following.

blinkie

        Blinkies are decorative GIFs containing phrases, quotes, and things typically relating to the user’s interests or likes. Hence the name “blinkie”, they tend to have flashing/blinking borders and/or text similar to neon signs. Blinkies can also include smaller images alongside their text, often animated as well. The average image size is 150x20 pixels.

Examples of blinkies:

button

        Site buttons are images often used by site creators to link to other websites, or for others to link back to their own. While this is the main purpose, some buttons can be purely decorative, similar to a blinkie or stamp. The most common size is 88x31, but 32x32 ones are also used.

Examples of buttons:

clique

districts (neighborhoods)

Dollz

fanlisting

        Fanlistings are websites dedicated to a singular topic, often “fandoms” such as TV shows, movies, video games, or even hobbies. A fanlisting also contains a sort of “membership” feature, where users can join said listing with a username and password. Fanlistings can then be displayed on members’ own sites through a button that links back to the main site.

frame (or ‘iframe’)

        A frame is an HTML tag that allows developers to embed content from other sites or pages onto their own site. They are the closest thing

Favicon

Flash

Geocities

        Geocities was a free website-hosting service that ran from 1994 to 2009 (though the Japanese version managed to last another 10 years). It fostered a community of amateur website developers that Neocities is attempting to recreate in the modern era.

Gifcities

        Gifcities is a project by The Internet Archive that aims to help users find GIFs from archived Geocities websites. Users can search keywords and the search engine will find GIFs with those words in the file name.

glitter text

        Glitter text is a style of decorative text for sites. Rather than being actual editable text, glitter text is made using external websites or programs (such as glittertextonline) and exported as images, usually GIFs.

Examples of glitter text:

guestbook

Internet Archive

        As defined by Wikipedia: “The Internet Archive is an American digital library with the stated mission of "universal access to all knowledge". It provides free public access to collections of digitized materials, including websites, software applications/games, music, movies/videos, moving images, and millions of books.”

        One of the more popular uses of the Internet Archive is the Wayback Machine, a digital archive of the World Wide Web.

Kao-Ani

        As defined by Wikipedia: "Kaoani comes from the Japanese kao and ani. Kaoanis are little animated smileys that usually bounce up and down to look like they are floating. Kaoani originate in Japan and are also known as puffs, anime blobs, anikaos or anime emoticons."

Examples of kao-ani:

 

Kaomoji

        As defined by Kaomoji.ru: Kaomoji (顔文字) is a popular Japanese emoticon style made up of Japanese characters and grammar punctuations, and are used to express emotion in texting and cyber communication. The word kaomoji is also synonymous to be referred to as Japanese emoticons.”

Examples of kaomoji:

        

ヽ(o^▽^o)ノ       (´。• ω •。`) ♡        (; ω ; )ヾ(´∀`* )                ʕ •ᴥ• ʔ        

Neocities

pixels

pixel trading

        Pixel trading is the idea of creating pixels to “trade” with other websites that you would collect and link to the original creator. They would usually be of a certain theme, and the idea was to create a community and a way to find other websites. Examples below:

shrine

        Shrines are webpages commonly used on personal sites dedicated to a single topic the creator enjoys.

splash page (or ‘flash splash’)

stamps

toybox

userboxes

        Similar to blinkies or stamps, userboxes are images with text relating to a user’s interests, personality, likes, or other things relating to them. The typical format is a solid-colored rectangle base, a small image to the left, and a phrase beginning with “This user ___” to the right. First popularized by Wikipedia userpages.

Examples of userboxes:

Web 1.0

web archive (the Wayback Machine)

Webgarden

        A project started by Neocities user missmoss, Webgardens are a community project where other users create small webpages called “pots” to advertise their own site.

webring